Tag Archives: windows runtime

How to Draw a Diagonal Line Using Only XAML (and no path data)

I’ve been playing around with an app to maintain a score. The first thing that I wanted to do was to split the screen, but I wanted a diagonal split; similar to this:

phonescreen

There are a number of ways that this can be achieved; however, this is a method using only XAML. The same method will (I believe) work on Windows 8, WPF and Windows Phone.

First, split the screen into three rows or columns (which depends on how you want the orientation):

        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

This needs to be an odd number of rows / columns if you want the line to be central; additionally, an increased number of rows or columns will result in a smaller incline. Next, draw a transparent rectangle across the middle grid square:

        <Rectangle Name="Placeholder" Grid.Row="1" 
                   HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
                   Opacity="0"/>

Finally, simply draw a line, binding the X2, Y2 values to the height and width of your rectangle:

        <Line Grid.Row="1" 
              X1="0" X2="{Binding ActualWidth, ElementName=Placeholder}"
              Y1="0" Y2="{Binding ActualHeight, ElementName=Placeholder}"
              StrokeThickness="2" Stroke="Blue"/>

Conclusion

I’m not saying the is the best, most efficient, or only way of doing this. However, it does mean that I can do it on both Windows Phone and Windows Store (and in WPF if I were so inclined) using a single shared project.

Creating and Binding to a User Control in MVVM Cross

While creating my game, I recently came across the problem of navigation. This post describes how to create a custom user control and react to the event inside.

The usual disclaimer still applies here; although this is an MVVM Cross post, the contents of it should be applicable for any MVVM Framework or, in fact, any XAML binding at all.

User Control

The user control that I’m going to use is simply a navigation bar to appear at the top of each screen.

The XAML for the user control is here:

<UserControl
    x:Name="NavigationControlRoot">
    
    <Grid DataContext="{Binding ElementName=NavigationControlRoot}">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"/>
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Button Content="Home" Grid.Column="0" Command="{Binding HomeClick}" />
        <Button Content="Back" Grid.Column="1" Command="{Binding BackClick}" />
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

So, I’ve got two commands, binding to the code behind. The key point here is that the root control (grid) binds to the DataContext of the user control – effectively this binds it to the containing DataContext. Here’s the code behind:

    public sealed partial class NavigationPanel : UserControl
    {
        public static DependencyProperty BackCommandProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "BackClick",
                typeof(ICommand),
                typeof(NavigationPanel),
                new PropertyMetadata(null));

        public static DependencyProperty HomeCommandProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register(
                "HomeClick",
                typeof(ICommand),
                typeof(NavigationPanel),
                new PropertyMetadata(null));

        public NavigationPanel()
        {
            this.InitializeComponent();
        }
        
        public ICommand BackClick
        {
            get
            {
                return (ICommand)GetValue(BackCommandProperty);
            }

            set
            {
                SetValue(BackCommandProperty, value);
            }
        }

        public ICommand HomeClick
        {
            get
            {
                return (ICommand)GetValue(HomeCommandProperty);
            }

            set
            {
                SetValue(HomeCommandProperty, value);
            }
        }        
    }

So, you’ve now exposed two dependency properties and bound them to the XAML in the user control.

Host App

Here’s the relevant XAML for the hosting view:

<controls:NavigationPanel BackClick="{Binding BackClickCommand}"                                  
                                  HomeClick="{Binding HomeClickCommand}"/>

And that just binds to the ViewModel as you would expect.

        private IMvxCommand _homeClickCommand;
        public IMvxCommand HomeClickCommand
        {
            get
            {
                if (_homeClickCommand == null)
                {
                    _homeClickCommand = new MvxCommand(() => GoHome());
                }
                return _homeClickCommand;
            }
            set
            {
                _homeClickCommand = value;
            }
        }

        private void GoHome()
        {
            ShowViewModel<MainViewModel>();
        }

For me, this is in a base view model, so it responds to the same command in every view.

Conclusion

I think the final version of this code will interact with an IMvxPresenter in some way, which may make another post.

Binding IsSelected Method in the ListView Control in WinRT

Basically, it’s not possible. However, this is the best (and only that works) workaround that I found.

Subclass the Listview

I tried everything. Absolutely everything.

I tried straightforward binding – that doesn’t work for IsSelected.
I tried using WinRT Xaml Toolkit – didn’t work.
I tried using Setters – they don’t work for WinRT.

Finally, I came across this solution; here’s the listview subclass (stolen directly from here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15994021/listviewitem-isselected-binding-works-for-wpf-but-not-for-winrt):

    public class ListViewEx : ListView
    {
        protected override void PrepareContainerForItemOverride(Windows.UI.Xaml.DependencyObject element, object item)
        {
            base.PrepareContainerForItemOverride(element, item);
            
            ListViewItem listItem = element as ListViewItem;
            Binding binding = new Binding();
            binding.Mode = BindingMode.TwoWay;
            binding.Source = item;
            binding.Path = new PropertyPath("IsSelected");
            listItem.SetBinding(ListViewItem.IsSelectedProperty, binding);
        }
    }

Obviously this does restrict the IsSelected property name. My class looks something like this:

    public class Person
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        …
    }

I didn’t want to add an IsSelected property to this; because it doesn’t directly relate to the entity. My solution was to wrap this inside a class such as this:

    public class SelectableItem<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        private T _item;
        public T Item 
        {
            get { return _item; }
            set
            {
                _item = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged();
            }
        }

        private bool _isSelected;
        public bool IsSelected
        {
            get { return _isSelected; }
            set
            {
                _isSelected = value;                
                RaisePropertyChanged();
            }
        }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
        protected void RaisePropertyChanged([CallerMemberName] string name = "")
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
            }
        }
}

And build it like this:

                List<Person> population = GetPeople();
                SelectablePeople = new ObservableCollection<SelectableItem<Person>>(population
                    .Select(n => new SelectableItem<Person>() { Item = n, IsSelected = false }).ToList());

So, finally, bind the collection to the new subclassed listview like this:

        <controls:ListViewEx x:Name="ItemListView" Grid.Column="0" Grid.Row="1"
                        ItemsSource="{Binding SelectablePeople}"                        
                        SelectionMode="Multiple"                        
                        Width="Auto" Height="Auto" >

            <controls:ListViewEx.ItemTemplate>
                <DataTemplate x:Name="MyTemplate">
                    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                        <TextBlock                            
                            Text="{Binding Item.Name}"/>
                    </StackPanel>
                </DataTemplate>
            </controls:ListViewEx.ItemTemplate>

        </controls:ListViewEx>

Windows Tile Updater (Part 5 – sharing XAML)

In Part 4 we finished with an MVVM app, running on both Windows 8 and Windows Phone. In this post I’m going to explore the idea of using the same XAML.

Is this a good idea?

The very short answer is probably “NO!”. The problem is that in anything but the most trivial of applications, the XAML will need to differ. In this application, it probably doesn’t matter, but then, it wouldn’t kill anyone to maintain two sets of very trivial XAML either.

My approach to this, and to the above question is to create a custom user control, and then use that in both applications. The good thing about this is that it does make sense to share user controls (to me anyway).

New UserControl

We’ll create a View directory in the shared project, and add the UserControl there:

NewView

It should look like this:

<UserControl
    x:Class="TileUpdater.View.MainView"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:TileUpdater.View"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="300"
    d:DesignWidth="400"
    DataContext="{Binding MVM, Source={StaticResource MainViewModel}}">

    <Grid Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" Margin="20" Grid.Row="0">
            <TextBlock FontSize="30" Margin="10">Image</TextBlock>
            <TextBox Text="{Binding ImagePath}" Margin="10"/>
        </StackPanel>

        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" Margin="20" Grid.Row="1">
            <TextBlock FontSize="30" Margin="10">Text</TextBlock>
            <TextBox Text="My Phone Number: 123456 890 12" Margin="10"/>
        </StackPanel>

        <Button Grid.Row="2" Command="{Binding UpdateCommand}">Update</Button>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

You’ll be familiar with this XAML by now. Nothing had changed, it’s the same. In the Phone app, we’ll replace the whole XAML with the following:

<Page
    x:Class="TileUpdater.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:TileUpdater"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    xmlns:view="using:TileUpdater.View"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">
    <view:MainView/>
</Page>

And the Windows 8 XAML with this:

<Page
    x:Class="TileUpdater.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:TileUpdater"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    xmlns:view="using:TileUpdater.View"
    mc:Ignorable="d">    

    <view:MainView/>
</Page>

Other than the theme, they are the same. You could obviously just have MainPage in the shared project, but personally, I don’t believe that is extensible; if you do so, you run the risk of ending up with an overly complex XAML file trying to cater for each separate project type.

Conclusion

Just a short post this time. In the next post on this, I’m going to add the missing functionality. This should be far easier now that the whole application is basically inside the shared project.