Tag Archives: Unity

Using Unity With Azure Functions

Azure Functions are a relatively new kid on the block when it comes to the Microsoft Azure stack. I’ve previously written about them, and their limitations. One such limitation seems to be that they don’t lend themselves very well to using dependency injection. However, it is certainly not impossible to make them do so.

In this particular post, we’ll have a look at how you might use an IoC container (Unity in this case) in order to leverage DI inside an Azure function.

New Azure Functions Project

I’ve covered this before in previous posts, in Visual Studio, you can now create a new Azure Functions project:

That done, you should have a project that looks something like this:

As you can see, the elephant in the room here is there are no functions; let’s correct that:

Be sure to call your function something descriptive… like “Function1”. For the purposes of this post, it doesn’t matter what kind of function you create, but I’m going to create a “Generic Web Hook”.

Install Unity

The next step is to install Unity (at the time of writing):

Install-Package Unity -Version 5.5.6

Static Variables Inside Functions

It’s worth bearing mind that a static variable works the way you would expect, were the function a locally hosted process. That is, if you write a function such as this:

[FunctionName("Function1")]
public static object Run([HttpTrigger(WebHookType = "genericJson")]HttpRequestMessage req, TraceWriter log)
{
    log.Info($"Webhook was triggered!");
    
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000);
    log.Info($"Index is {test}");
    return req.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, new
    {
        greeting = $"Hello {test++}!"
    });
}

And access it from a web browser, or postman, or both as the same time, you’ll get incrementing numbers:

Whilst the values are shared across the instances, you can’t cause a conflict by updating something in one function while reading it in another (I tried pretty hard to cause this to break). What this means, then, is that we can store an IoC container that will maintain state across function calls. Obviously, this is not intended for persisting state, so you should assume your state could be lost at any time (as indeed it can).

Registering the Unity Container

One method of doing this is to use the Lazy object. This pretty much passed me by in .Net 4 (which is, apparently, when it came out). It basically provides a slightly neater way of doing this kind of thing:

private List<string> _myList;
public List<string> MyList
{
    get
    {
        if (_myList == null)
        {
            _myList = new List<string>();
        }
        return _myList;
    }
}

The “lazy” method would be:

public Lazy<List<string>> MyList = new Lazy<List<string>>(() =>
{
    List<string> newList = new List<string>();
    return newList;
});

With that in mind, we can do something like this:

public static class Function1
{
     private static Lazy<IUnityContainer> _container =
         new Lazy<IUnityContainer>(() =>
         {
             IUnityContainer container = InitialiseUnityContainer();
             return container;
         });

InitialiseUnityContainer needs to return a new instance of the container:

public static IUnityContainer InitialiseUnityContainer()
{
    UnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
    container.RegisterType<IMyClass1, MyClass1>();
    container.RegisterType<IMyClass2, MyClass2>();
    return container;
}

After that, you’ll need to resolve the parent dependency, then you can use standard constructor injection; for example, if MyClass1 orchestrates your functionality; you could use:

_container.Value.Resolve<IMyClass1>().DoStuff();

In Practise

Let’s apply all of that to our Functions App. Here’s two new classes:

public interface IMyClass1
{
    string GetOutput();
}
 
public interface IMyClass2
{
    void AddString(List<string> strings);
}
public class MyClass1 : IMyClass1
{
    private readonly IMyClass2 _myClass2;
 
    public MyClass1(IMyClass2 myClass2)
    {
        _myClass2 = myClass2;
    }
 
    public string GetOutput()
    {
        List<string> teststrings = new List<string>();
 
        for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++)
        {
            _myClass2.AddString(teststrings);
        }
 
        return string.Join(",", teststrings);
    }
}
public class MyClass2 : IMyClass2
{
    public void AddString(List<string> strings)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        strings.Add($"{DateTime.Now}");
    }
}

And the calling code looks like this:

[FunctionName("Function1")]
public static object Run([HttpTrigger(WebHookType = "genericJson")]HttpRequestMessage req, TraceWriter log)
{
    log.Info($"Webhook was triggered!");
 
    string output = _container.Value.Resolve<IMyClass1>().GetOutput();
    return req.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, new
    {
        output
    });
}

Running it, we get an output that we might expect:

References

https://github.com/Azure/azure-webjobs-sdk/issues/1206

Building Block Game in Unity 3D

Not sure this qualifies as a game, but it’s a computerised version of the building blocks that you might give to a three-year-old. What can I say, it was a nice way to spend a Sunday afternoon !

Here’s what the finished game / program looks like:

The Script

There is only one script:

public class BehaviourScript : MonoBehaviour
{
    
    private Vector3 screenPoint;
    private Vector3 offset;
 
    void OnMouseDown()
    {
        screenPoint = Camera.main.WorldToScreenPoint(gameObject.transform.position);
        offset = gameObject.transform.position - Camera.main.ScreenToWorldPoint(new Vector3(Input.mousePosition.x, Input.mousePosition.y, screenPoint.z));
    }
 
    void OnMouseDrag()
    {
        Vector3 cursorPoint = new Vector3(Input.mousePosition.x, Input.mousePosition.y, screenPoint.z);
        Vector3 cursorPosition = Camera.main.ScreenToWorldPoint(cursorPoint) + offset;
 
        if (cursorPosition.y > 0)
        {
            transform.position = cursorPosition;
        }
    }
}

The Scene

Basically, the blocks are standard unit cubes with a wood texture, a rigid body and the above script attached:

Mesh Colliders in Unity

Mesh colliders are, generally speaking, a bad idea in Unity. The reason being that they cause collision based on the detailed mesh that forms the object. This is bad, basically because this generates many collision points. Consider this object:

meshcollider1

As you can see, it’s a basic cylinder (a cup), so a box collider would add eight collision points. A mesh collider generates a point for each of the 496 vertices.

meshcollider2

So, whilst it’s more accurate, it uses more resources.

Okay, so now I’ve said why you shouldn’t use a mesh collider, I’ll cover how to use them.

Firstly, you need to add a mesh collider:

meshcollider3

There are three important things to note here:

  1. There is a mesh collider
  2. It is convex
    1. The convex flag allows the collider to collide with other colliders
  3. It is not a trigger
    1. The trigger flag turns the collision into a programmatic notification only

The manual for this is here.

Adding Cheats and Features to a Unity Game for Development Only

I’m currently writing a breakout style game (which, if you’ve seen any of my previous posts, you might have divined). One of the things that I would like to do with this, without having to play through all the levels is to complete the level quickly. This led me down the path of creating a “Cheat” button. However, for those amongst you that remember the ZX Spectrum, the makers of Jet Set Willy may have had a similar idea, but left the “Pokes” in the final game.

To avoid this, I thought it must be possible to use a feature such as the compiler directive in C#. In fact it is. Unity has its own, and one is to determine whether you’re running in the editor.

Here’s how I conditionally display the button:

    void OnGUI()
    {
#if UNITY_EDITOR
        if (GUI.Button(new Rect(10, 30, 50, 30), "Cheat"))
        {
            var o = GameObject.FindGameObjectsWithTag("Brick");
            foreach (var b in o)
            {
                var r = b.GetComponent<Rigidbody>();
	        r.transform.position += new Vector3(0, 0, zOffset);
                r.useGravity = true;
            }
        }
#endif
    }

This particular cheat just makes all of the bricks fall out of the sky. UNITY_EDITOR is one of a list of pre-defined “Platform Defines” that can be found here.

Playing a longer running animation in Unity

Continuing on with my list of things that I’ve found in unity (I’m using 5, but have no reason to believe these wouldn’t work for 4), I had cause to execute an attack animation in a character. For reference, the character I’ve been using is here

So far, when playing an animation, I’ve used something similar to this:

gameObject.GetComponent<Animation>().Play("Idle_2");

In fact, if you put that in the Update of the linked object, you’ll get an angry looking chap looking like he’s about to charge. In order to plumb in the attack, it’s necessary to cache the animation. Start with a class level variable:

private Animation _animation;

Then, inside the update statement, something similar to this:

void Update ()
{
    if (_animation != null && _animation.IsPlaying("Attack_1")) return;

    if (Input.GetKeyDown(KeyCode.Space))
    {
        if (_animation == null)
            _animation = gameObject.GetComponent<Animation>();
        _animation.Play("Attack_1");            
    }
}

One of the bizarre things that I learnt about unity while doing this, was that if you have a null reference, it doesn’t crash. It doesn’t work, but it doesn’t crash.

I find this annoying.

Advancing to the next Level in Unity

I’m quite new to Unity, and so thought I would start blogging useful things that I’ve discovered. Obviously, there is the which is basically where all this information comes from, and also an excellent tutorial on YouTube. I found this after trying a Pluralsight course on Unity, but rapidly losing the will to live while watching it.

In my particular example, I have a game, whereby touching a specific object progresses to the next level. Here’s the code (against the target object):

    void OnCollisionEnter()
    {
        if (Application.loadedLevel < Application.levelCount)
            Application.LoadLevel(Application.loadedLevel + 1);
        
    }

I admit, it’s not exactly rocket science, but it took me a while to work this out. I spent some time trying to parse the level name, and other workarounds, before I spotted that it’s all in the Application object.