Tag Archives: Schedule

Azure Service Bus – Scheduled Message Delivery

Azure Service Bus sets itself apart from other message brokers by the dizzying array of additional and useful features that it provides out of the box. This particular one is really useful for things like scheduled e-mails. Let’s say, for example, that you’re an event organiser, and you want to notify people a few days before the event. This feature enables you to tell Service Bus to simply send a message at that time (you could have a simple Azure function that then picked up the message and sent an e-mail).

If you’re new to Service Bus, or using it with .Net, then start here.

NuGet

The basic NuGet package you’ll need is here:

Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus

Reading the Service Bus Message

For the purpose of this post, we’ll just set-up a basic console application that sends and receives the message; let’s start with the read:

private static Task ReadMessageEvent(string connectionString)
{
    var queueClient = new QueueClient(connectionString, QUEUE_NAME);

    var messageHandlerOptions = new MessageHandlerOptions(ExceptionHandler);
    queueClient.RegisterMessageHandler(handleMessage, messageHandlerOptions);

    return Task.CompletedTask;
}

private static Task ExceptionHandler(ExceptionReceivedEventArgs arg)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Something bad happened!");
    return Task.CompletedTask;
}

private static Task handleMessage(Message message, CancellationToken cancellation)
{
    string messageBody = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(message.Body);
    Console.WriteLine("Message received: {0}", messageBody);

    return Task.CompletedTask;
}

There’s not much to say here – this event will simply print a message to the console when it’s received.

Schedule the Service Bus Message

Now that we’ve set up a method to receive the messages, let’s send one. You could add this to the same console app (obviously it would have to occur after the Read!)

var queueClient = new QueueClient(connectionString, QUEUE_NAME);

string messageBody = $"{DateTime.Now}: Happy New Year! ({Guid.NewGuid()}) You won't get this until {dateTime}";
var message = new Message(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(messageBody));

long sequenceNumber = await queueClient.ScheduleMessageAsync(message, dateTime);
//await queueClient.CancelScheduledMessageAsync(sequenceNumber);

await queueClient.CloseAsync();

dateTime is simply the time that you wish to send the message; for example:

var dateTime = DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(10)

Will send the message in 10 seconds.

The commented line above will then cancel the message from being sent – you only need to provide the sequence number (which you get from setting up the schedule in the first place).

References and A GitHub Example

For a working sample of this, please see here.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/60437666/how-to-defer-a-azure-service-bus-message

Creating a Scheduled Azure Function

I’ve previously written about creating Azure functions. I’ve also written about how to react to service bus queues. In this post, I wanted to cover creating a scheduled function. Basically, these allow you to create a scheduled task that executes at a given interval, or at a given time.

Timer Trigger

The first thing to do is create a function with a type of Timer Trigger:

Schedule / CRON format

The next thing is to understand the schedule, or CRON, format. The format is:

{second} {minute} {hour} {day} {month} {day-of-week}

Scheduled Intervals

The example you’ll see when you create this looks like this:

0 */5 * * * *

The notation */[number] means once every number; so */5 would mean once every 5… and then look at the placeholder to work out 5 what; in this case it means once every 5 minutes. So, for example:

*/10 * * * * *

Would be once every 10 seconds.

Scheduled Times

Specifying numbers means the schedule will execute at that time; so:

0 0 0 * * *

Would execute every time the hour, minute and second all hit zero – so once per day at midnight; and:

0 * * * * *

Would execute every time the second hits zero – so once per minute; and:

0 0 * * * 1

Would execute once per hour on a Monday (as the last placeholder is the day of the week).

Time constraints

These can be specified in any column in the format [lower bound]-[upper bound], and they restrict the timer to a range of values; for example:

0 */20 5-10 * * *

Means every 20 minutes between 5 and 10am (as you can see, the different types can be used in conjunction).

Asterisks (*)

You’ll notice above that there are asterisks in every placeholder that a value has not been specified. The askerisk signifies that the schedule will execute at every interval within that placeholder; for example:

* * * * * *

Means every second; and:

0 * * * * *

Means every minute.

Back to the function

Upon starting, the function will detail when the next several executions will take place:

But what if you don’t know what the schedule will be at compile time. As with many of the variables in an Azure Function, you can simply substitute the value for a placeholder:

[FunctionName("MyFunc")]
public static void Run([TimerTrigger("%schedule%")]TimerInfo myTimer, TraceWriter log)
{
    log.Info($"C# Timer trigger function executed at: {DateTime.Now}");
}

This value can then be provided inside the local.settings.json:

{
  "IsEncrypted": false,
  "Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": "DefaultEndpointsProto . . .",
    "AzureWebJobsDashboard": "DefaultEndpointsProto . . .",
    "schedule": "0 * * * * *"
  }
}

References

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-functions/functions-bindings-timer

http://cronexpressiondescriptor.azurewebsites.net/?expression=1+*+*+*+*+*&locale=en