Tag Archives: Newtonsoft

My object won’t deserialise using System.Text.Json

I imagine this is a very common scenario, so I thought it worth documenting.

Let’s take the following controller method in a bog standard Asp.Net Core API:

        public async Task<DataContainer> Get()
        {
            var data = Enumerable.Range(1, 5).Select(index => new MyData
            {
                Value1 = index,
                Value2 = "some other value"
            })
            .ToList();

            return new DataContainer()
            {
                Data = data
            };
        }

Here’s a method that consumes it:

            var client = _clientFactory.CreateClient();
            var result = await client.GetAsync($"https://localhost:22222/endpoint");

            using var responseStream = await result.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();
            var data = await JsonSerializer.DeserializeAsync<DataContainer>(responseStream);

So, you’ve expect this to work, right? It makes no difference what DataContainer looks like, because you’re serialising and deserialising using the same technology. In fact, it just returns a correctly structured object, but every value will be null.

I’ll tell you what does work, is this:

            var client = _clientFactory.CreateClient();
            var result = await client.GetAsync($"https://localhost:22222/endpoint");

            var responseString = await result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            var data = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<DataContainer>(responseString);             

If you look at the JSON, it looks kosher enough (again, the exact structure is irrelevant). So, what’s the issue?

Interestingly, when the JSON is serialised, it is serialised into camelCase; so if you have a variable such as MyData, it will get serialised as myData. Newtonsoft deals with this, because it’s a common use case in .Net; however, System.Text.Json.Deserialize* assumes that the casing will match the object!

This is odd considering it changes it on the way out!!

Okay, so what’s the fix?

You just tell Deserialize* to use camelCase:

            var client = _clientFactory.CreateClient();
            var result = await client.GetAsync($"https://localhost:22222/endpoint");

            using var responseStream = await result.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();

            var options = new JsonSerializerOptions()
            {
                PropertyNamingPolicy = JsonNamingPolicy.CamelCase
            };
            var data = await JsonSerializer.DeserializeAsync<DataContainer>(responseStream, options);

Annoying, eh?

References

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/serialization/system-text-json-migrate-from-newtonsoft-how-to#table-of-differences-between-newtonsoftjson-and-systemtextjson

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/serialization/system-text-json-how-to#use-camel-case-for-all-json-property-names

Xamarin Dependencies – Android App Just Doesn’t Start After Deployment

Being relatively new to Xamarin, I naively expected any errors to just show up, you know, like when you run a console app after headbutting the keyboard, it gives you some vague indication that there’s a problem with your code.

My story starts with the default template of Xamarin, running just an Android application. I just want to mention again that this is the default template (admittedly I am running VS2019 and .Net Core 3.0 – at the time of writing, .Net Core 3.0 is still in preview).

Anyway, I start writing my app, and everything is running fine. I add a button, and it appears, I do something on button press: it does it – I’m on a roll! Then I add a chunk of code that calls an API… and suddenly the app just doesn’t run. It compiles and deploys fine, but it doesn’t run. At all.

It occurred to me that this does, potentially, make sense. The code that’s generated may now be complete garbage. In the same way as if you headbutted the keyboard in your console app, the C# compiler will simply run and JIT your C# into invalid IL… Except, that’s not what happens. No sane (statically typed) compiled system would compile a bunch of crap and deploy it… but hey ho.

So, why would my app not run?

Well, it was down to the following line:

var data = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<MyData>>(contentString);

The reason being that, by default, JSON.Net is not installed in the default template; however, because it (or a version of it) is a dependency of one of the other libraries, it is accessible! Presumably there’s a conflict somewhere, or when this compiles it produces a big pile of steaming Java!

(I realise it doesn’t compile down to Java – but I think you’ll agree, steaming IL doesn’t have the same ring to it.)

Anyway, the moral of the story is: check your Newtonsoft dependencies, and liberally distribute try / catch blocks everywhere – it seems to be the only way to get a half sensible error from Xamarin.

Manually Parsing a JSON String Using JSON.NET

How to manually parse a JSON string using JSON.NET.

Disclaimer

If you jump straight to the references, you will find a very similar set of information, and I strongly encourage people to do so. Additionally, this is probably not the most efficient way to achieve this.

Right, on with the show

Here’s the string that I’ll be parsing, and a little code stolen directly from the link at the bottom to show what it looks like:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string json = "{\"documents\":[{\"keyPhrases\":[\"Test new bug\"],\"id\":\"1\"}],\"errors\":[]}";
    JsonTextReader reader = new JsonTextReader(new StringReader(json));
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        if (reader.Value != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Token: {0}, Value: {1}", reader.TokenType, reader.Value);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Token: {0}", reader.TokenType);
        }
    }
 
    Console.ReadLine();
}

The output for this looks like:

Using this, it’s easier to create a routine to manually parse this. Each object can be tracked by using the Start and EndObject tags. Here’s my unit test to check this works:

[TestMethod]
public void TestJSONParse()
{
    // Arrange
    string json = "{\"documents\":[{\"keyPhrases\":[\"Test new bug\"],\"id\":\"1\"}],\"errors\":[]}";
    // Act
    var result = JsonHelper.ParseResponse(json);
 
    // Assert
    Assert.AreEqual(1, result.Count());
    Assert.AreEqual(1, result.Keys.First());
    string expectedPhrase = result.Values.First().First().ToString();
    Assert.AreEqual("Test new bug", expectedPhrase, false);
}

And here’s the code itself:

/// <summary>
/// Parse the following JSON
/// {"documents":[{"keyPhrases":["Test new bug"],"id":"1"}],"errors":[]}
/// </summary>
/// <param name="response"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static Dictionary<int, List<string>> ParseResponse(string response)
{
    Dictionary<int, List<string>> dict = new Dictionary<int, List<string>>();
    object readerValue;
 
    if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(response))
    {
        JsonTextReader reader = new JsonTextReader(new StringReader(response));
        int? currentValue = null;
        List<string> currentList = null;
 
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            readerValue = reader.Value;
 
            switch (reader.TokenType)
            {
                case JsonToken.PropertyName:                            
                    if (readerValue.ToString() == "id")
                    {
                        reader.Read();
                        currentValue = int.Parse(reader.Value.ToString());                                
                    }
                    else if (readerValue.ToString() == "keyPhrases")
                    {
                        // Do nothing
                    }
                    else if (readerValue.ToString() == "errors")
                    {
                        currentValue = null;
                    }
                    break;
 
                case JsonToken.String:                            
                    currentList.Add(reader.Value.ToString());
                    break;
 
                case JsonToken.StartArray:
                    currentList = new List<string>();
                    break;
 
                case JsonToken.StartObject:
                    currentList = null;
                    currentValue = null;
                    break;
 
                case JsonToken.EndObject:
                    if (currentValue.HasValue)
                    {
                        dict.Add(currentValue.Value, currentList);
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
 
    return dict;
}

It is messy, and it is error prone, and it would be better done by creating classes and serialising it; however, I’d never attempted to do this manually before, and it’s generally nice to do things the hard way, that way, you can appreciate what you get from these tools.

References

http://www.newtonsoft.com/json/help/html/ReadJsonWithJsonTextReader.htm

MVVMCross – Overriding The Default Plugins

Following on from this post I discovered that I did, indeed, have a recursive reference in my game file. After a little searching, I found this excellent article on how to prevent this error, and to make the Json serializer behave rationally.

In MVVMCross, the code to serialize JSON is based on a standard plugin; it looks like this (or at least this is how I am saving my game):

public void Save()
{
    var jsonConv = Mvx.Resolve<IMvxJsonConverter>();            
    string text = jsonConv.SerializeObject(this);
    FileHelper.SaveGameFile(text);
}

The type is registered in App.cs like this:

Mvx.RegisterType<IMvxJsonConverter, MvxJsonConverter>();

What’s the fix?

The above article says the fix is this:

Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
{
    PreserveReferencesHandling = PreserveReferencesHandling.Objects

(it does go into more detail and I encourage everyone to read it).

So this is a change to MVVM Cross

Might be.

However, you can always use your own Serializer. One of the things that I’ve come to really like about MVVM Cross if that if you don’t like something, just write your own and override that specific thing. I stole this code, verbatim, from MVVM Cross, with the single exception of the one line above:

    public class MyJSonConverter : IMvxJsonConverter
    {
        private static readonly JsonSerializerSettings Settings;

        static KMJSonConverter()
        {
            Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
            {
                ReferenceLoopHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.ReferenceLoopHandling.Serialize,
                Converters = new List<JsonConverter>
                        {
                            new MvxEnumJsonConverter(),
                        },
                DateFormatHandling = DateFormatHandling.IsoDateFormat,
                PreserveReferencesHandling = PreserveReferencesHandling.Objects
            };
        }

        public T DeserializeObject<T>(string inputText)
        {
            return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(inputText, Settings);
        }

        public string SerializeObject(object toSerialise)
        {
            return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(toSerialise, Formatting.None, Settings);
        }

        public object DeserializeObject(Type type, string inputText)
        {
            return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(inputText, type, Settings);
        }
    }

Now, in App.cs, just change how it is registered:

Mvx.RegisterType<IMvxJsonConverter, MyJSonConverter>();
//Mvx.RegisterType<IMvxJsonConverter, MvxJsonConverter>();

Job done. It now works!