Tag Archives: Http

Debugging a Failed API Request, and Defining an Authorization Header Using Fiddler Everywhere

Postman is a really great tool, but I’ve recently been playing with Telerik’s new version of Fiddler – Fiddler Everywhere. You’re probably thinking that these are separate tools, that do separate jobs… and before Fiddler Everywhere, you’d have been right. However, have a look at this screen:

…In fact it’s not Postman. The previous version of this tool (called Compose) from Fiddler 4 was pretty clunky – but now you can simply right-click on a request and select “Edit in Compose”.

Use Case

Let’s imagine for a minute, that you’ve made a request, and you got a 401 because the authentication header wasn’t set. You can open that request in Fiddler:

In fact, this returns a nice little web snippet, which we can see by selecting the Web tab:

The error:

The request requires HTTP authentication

This error means that authentication details have not been passed to the API; typically, these can be passed in the header, in the form:

Authorization: Basic EncodedUsernamePassword

So, let’s try re-issuing that call in Fiddler – let’s start with the encoding. Visit this site and enter into the Encode section your username and password:

Username:password

For example:

In Fiddler, right click on the request in question, and select to Edit in Compose. You should now see the full request, and be able to edit any part of it; for example, you can add an Authorization header:

Now that you’ve proved that works, you can make the appropriate change in the code – here’s what that looks like in C#:

            byte[] bytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes($"{username}:{password}");
            var auth = Convert.ToBase64String(bytes);

            var client = _httpClientFactory.CreateClient();
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add($"Authorization", $"Basic {auth}");

Azure Functions

Azure functions are Microsoft’s answer to “serverless” architecture. The concept behind Serverless Architecture being that you can create service functionality, but you don’t need to worry about a server. Obviously, there is one: it’s not magic; it’s just not your problem.

How?

Let’s start by creating a new Azure function app:

Once created, search “All resources”; you might need to give it a minute or two:

Next, it asks you to pick function type. In this case, we’re going to pick “Custom function”:

Azure then displays a plethora of options for creating your function. We’re going to go for “Generic Webhook” (and name it):

A Webhook is a http callback; meaning that you can use them in the same way as you would any other HTTP service.

This creates your function (with some default code):

We’ll leave the default code, and run it (because you can’t go wrong with default code – it always does exactly what you need… assuming what you need is what it does):

The right hand panel shows the output from the function. Which means that the function works; so, we now have a web based function that works… well… says hello world (ish). How do we call it?

Using the function

The function has an allocated URL:

Given that we have a service, and a connection URL; the rest is pretty straightforward. Let’s try to connect from a console application:

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
            string url = "https://pcm-test.azurewebsites.net/api/pcm_GenericWebhookCSharp1?code=Kk2397soUoaK7hbxQa6qUSMV2S/AvLCvjn508ujAJMMZiita5TsjkQ==";

            var inputObject = new
            {
                first = "pcm-Test-input-first",
                last = "pcm-Test-input-last"
            };
            string param = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(inputObject);
            HttpContent content = new StringContent(param, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");

            HttpResponseMessage response = client.PostAsync(url, content).Result;
            string results = response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;

            Console.WriteLine($"results: {results}");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

When run, this returns:

Conclusion

Let’s think about what we’ve just done here: we have set up a service, connected to that service from a remote source and returned data. Now, let’s think about what we haven’t done: any configuration; that is, other than clicking “Create Function”.

This “serverless” architecture seems to be the nth degree of SOA. If I wish, I can create one of these functions for each of the server activities in my application, they are available to anything with an internet connection. It then becomes Microsoft’s problem if my new website suddenly takes off and millions of people are trying to access it.

References

http://robertmayer.se/2016/04/19/azure-function-app-to-send-emails/

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/article/azure-functions-create-generic-webhook-trigger/