Tag Archives: collision

Creating a Game in Blazor – Part 4 – Platform and Collision

I’ve recently been creating a JetSet Willy clone in Blazor. I use the term clone loosely – I’m actually not creating a clone or anything like it – I’m simply replicating some aspects of the game (moving, jumping, platforms, collision, etc.).

This is the fourth post in the series that started here. In this post, I’m going to add a platform – so far we’ve been walking on the air.

As with previous posts, the code for this can be found here on GitHub.

In order to do this, we’ll need to do a bit of refactoring, and to introduce a crude collision concept. Let’s start with the refactoring and platform display:

We’re introducing the concept of a base GameObject, from which, Platform, Player, and NPC inherit. We’re dispensibg of IPlayer, and instead, adapting World to manage the elements in the world:

    public class World : IWorld
    {
        private readonly IEnumerable<GameObject> _gameObjects;

        public World(IEnumerable<GameObject> gameObjects)
        {
            _gameObjects = gameObjects;
        }

        public Player Player
        {
            get => (Player)_gameObjects.First(a => a.GameObjectType == GameObjectType.Player);
        }

        public IEnumerable<GameObject> Platforms 
        {  
            get => _gameObjects.Where(a => a.
                GameObjectType == GameObjectType.Platform);
        }

        public void ApplyPhysics()
        {   
            foreach (var gameObject in _gameObjects)
            {
                gameObject.Update();
            }            

        }
        
    }

We’re not dealing with NPCs in this post, but we are dealing with platforms. The new Platform class currently looks like this:

    public class Platform : GameObject
    {
        public Platform(int width, int height, int left, int top)
        {
            Width = width;
            Height = height;
            Left = left;
            Top = top;
            GameObjectType = GameObjectType.Platform;
        }

        public override void Update()
        {
            //throw new System.NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

We’ll no doubt come back to this, but essentially, all we’re doing is maintaining a collection of GameObjects with a specific type.

For now, we’ll inject the properties of the World in through Program.cs:

    public class Program
    {
        public static async Task Main(string[] args)
        {
            var builder = WebAssemblyHostBuilder.CreateDefault(args);
            builder.RootComponents.Add<App>("#app");

            builder.Services.AddScoped(sp => new HttpClient { BaseAddress = new Uri(builder.HostEnvironment.BaseAddress) });
            builder.Services.AddSingleton<IWorld, World>(srv =>
            {
                var platform = new Platform(
                    50, 10, 0, WorldSettings.FLOOR);

                var player = new Player(17, 21, new[] { platform })
                {
                    GameObjectType = GameObjectType.Player,
                };

                var world = new World(new GameObject[] { player, platform });                
                return world;
            });            
            builder.Services.AddSingleton<IControls, Controls>();
            builder.Services.AddSingleton<IGraphics, Graphics>();

            await builder.Build().RunAsync();
        }
    }

As you can see, we build the Platform and Player and then build the world. Finally, we adapt Game.razor to display the platforms:

@page "/"
@using System.Timers
@using BlazorGame.GameLogic
@inject IEnumerable<GameObject> GameObjects
@inject IControls Controls
@inject IWorld World
@inject IGraphics Graphics

<div @onkeydown="HandleKeyDown" @onkeyup="HandleKeyUp" @onkeydown:preventDefault 
    style="background-color: #000000; width: 80vw; height: 80vh; margin: auto"
    tabindex="0" @ref="mainDiv">
    <div style="color: white; top: @(World.Player.Top)px; left: @(World.Player.Left)px; width: @(World.Player.Width)px; height: @(World.Player.Height)px; overflow: hidden; position: relative">
        <img 
            src="/images/Willy-Sprite-Sheet.png" 
            style="margin: 0 @(Graphics.PlayerOffset)px; transform: scaleX(@(Graphics.PlayerDirection))" />
    </div>

    @foreach (var platform in World.Platforms)
    {
        <div style="position: relative; top:@(platform.Top)px; left:@(platform.Left)px; width:@(platform.Width)px; height:@(platform.Height)px; border: 1px solid #FFFFFF; background-color: #FFFFFF"></div>
    }
</div>

Finally, we need to ensure that our player lands on the platform (and doesn’t simply drop through). For now, we’ll pass the World into Player and perform the logic there:

        public override void Update()
        {
            _forceUp -= WorldSettings.GRAVITY;

            Top -= _forceUp;

            Console.WriteLine($"Top: {Top}, Left: {Left}, Width: {Width}");

            var platform = _gameObjects.FirstOrDefault(a =>
                a.Top <= Top &&
                a.Left <= Left + Width &&
                a.Left + a.Width >= Left + Width &&
                a.GameObjectType == GameObjectType.Platform);
            
            if (platform != null)
            {
                Top = platform.Top;
                _forceUp = 0;
            }
            
            if (Left <= 0 && _forceRight < 0) 
                _forceRight = 0;
            else if (_forceRight != 0)
                _direction = _forceRight;            

            Left += _forceRight;
            
        }

It’s not quite finished yet, but we now have a platform that we can walk on, and fall off:

What’s Next?

In the next post, I’ll try to introduce an NPC (not quite sure where I can get the graphics from yet, so it might just be a rectangle or something).

Creating a Car Game in React – Part 4 – Score

This is the fourth part of a series (that began here). So far, we have a game where you can whizz around the screen avoiding trees. This effectively encompasses most aspects of a game of this type; that is, you can move, and there is a something preventing you.

The next step is to introduce something for the player to try to do, and give a score based on that. In our case, our player is going to try and collect cups – as per the original game. The asset I’ve created for the cup is here. For anyone following this series, you may have noticed that my artwork is a little… crap.

The source for this post is here.

Cups

The first thing that we’ve done here is added some code to place a few cups around the screen; the code for this was essentially the same as build obstacles:

placeCups() {
	let cups = [];
	const cupCount = 1;
	for (let i = 1; i <= cupCount; i++) {
		const centreX = Math.floor(Math.random() * this.state.windowWidth) + 1;
		const centreY = Math.floor(Math.random() * this.state.windowHeight) + 1; 
		cups.push(<GameItem key={i} image={cupImg} centreX={centreX} centreY={centreY} width={this.spriteWidth} height={this.spriteHeight} itemType={2} />);
	}
	return cups;
}

In a later post, I hope to do a full refactor, but for now, we have a separate function. This is rendered in the same way as the obstacles:

render() { 
	return <div onKeyDown={this.onKeyDown} tabIndex="0">
		<GameStatus Lives={this.state.playerLives} Message={this.state.message} Score={this.state.score} />
		
		<Background backgroundImage={backgroundImg}
		windowWidth={this.state.windowWidth} windowHeight={this.state.windowHeight} /> 
		
		<Car carImage={this.state.playerCrashed ? brokenCarImg : carImg} 
		centreX={this.state.playerX} centreY={this.state.playerY} 
		width={this.spriteWidth} height={this.spriteHeight} 
		rotation={this.state.playerRotation} /> 
		
		{this.obstacles} 
		
		{this.cups} 
	</div>
}

Collecting cups

In order to collect something, the player must collide with it. We need to change the collision code slightly to make it a little more re-usable:

detectAnyCollision(rect1) { 
	// Have we crashed or left the screen
	if (this.detectOutScreen(rect1)) {
		return true;
	}
	let collided = this.detectGameItemCollision(this.halfWidth, this.halfHeight, rect1, this.obstacles);
	if (collided !== undefined) {
		return true;
	}
	return false;
}

detectGameItemCollision(halfWidth, halfHeight, rect1, gameItemList) {
	const collided = gameItemList.find(a => {
		var rect2 = {
			x: a.props.centreX - halfWidth, y: a.props.centreY - halfHeight,
			width: this.spriteWidth, height: this.spriteHeight
		};
		return (this.detectCollision(rect1, rect2));
	}); 
	return collided;
}

As you can see, we now have a function that returns the item that we collided with, rather than a simple boolean. We then use this at the end of the game loop to determine whether we collided with a cup:

// Check for collected cup
const item = this.detectGameItemCollision(this.halfWidth, this.halfHeight, rect1, this.cups);
if (item !== undefined) {
	this.collectedCup(item.key);
} 

Score

There’s little point in zooming around collecting cups, if there’s no permanent record, so we need to add a score. Let’s start with a state variable in game.jsx:

this.state = {
	playerX: 100,
	playerY: 100,
	windowWidth: 1500,
	windowHeight: 1500,
	playerMomentum: 0,
	playerRotation: 0,
	playerVelocityX: 0,
	playerVelocityY: 0,
	playerLives: 3,
	playerCrashed: false,
	gameLoopActive: false,
	message: "",
	score: 0
};

And here’s the collectedCup function we mentioned a second ago:

collectedCup(key) {
	this.setState({ score: this.state.score + 1 });
	this.cups = this.cups.filter(cup => cup.key != key);
	this.updateMessage("Collected cup");
}

All we’re doing here is simply updating the score and then removing that cup from the list.

The final part is to display the score on the screen; let’s have a look at our updated GameStatus.jsx:

function GameStatus(props) {
	const flexStyle = {
		display: 'flex',
		position: 'absolute',
		zIndex: 1,
		margin: 20,
		justifyContent: 'center',
		alignItems: 'center',
		width: '100%'
	};
	const labelStyle = { 
		zIndex: 1,
		margin: 50
	};
	return ( 
		<div className="flex-container" style={flexStyle}>
			<label style={labelStyle}>
				Lives Remaining: {props.Lives}
			</label>
			<label style={labelStyle}>
				Score: {props.Score}
			</label>
			<label style={labelStyle}>
				{props.Message}
			</label>
		</div> 
	);
}

As you can see, we’re just displaying the score as part of the status.

In the next post, we’ll have a look at the concept of levels, and introduce a time limit.

Reference

https://www.w3schools.com/css/css3_flexbox.asp

Creating a Car Game in React – Part 3 – Collision

In this, the third post of this series, we’re going to add collision to the game. For a full list of the code, please see here.

If you’re wondering about earlier posts, please start here.

Since we’re introducing collision, we’ll also need to introduce the age old game concept of “Lives”. The premise here is that when you crash into something, you lose a life.

The first step is to add a new state variable to hold the player’s remaining lives:

this.state = {
	playerX: 100,
	playerY: 100,
	windowWidth: 1500,
	windowHeight: 1500,
	playerMomentum: 0,
	playerRotation: 0,
	playerVelocityX: 0,
	playerVelocityY: 0,
	playerLives: 3,
	gameLoopActive: false,
	message: ""
};

If you have a look in the repository, there’s a bit of refactoring, where I’ve taken some of the setState code and separated it into logical functions. I won’t list that here.

Collision Detection

At the end of the game loop, we now have a call to check if we’ve collided with anything:

if (this.detectAnyCollision()) {
	this.PlayerDies(); 
}

The collision detection code is quite straight forward, and is based on the simplistic idea that all objects can be considered rectangles. Whilst this is not precise, it’s sufficient for our purpose:

detectAnyCollision() { 
        const halfWidth = this.spriteWidth / 2;
        const halfHeight = this.spriteHeight / 2;

        let rect1 = {x: this.state.playerX - halfWidth, y: this.state.playerY - halfHeight, 
            width: this.spriteWidth, height: this.spriteHeight}

        if (this.detectOutScreen(rect1)) {
            return true;
        }

        return this.obstacles.some(a => {
            var rect2 = {x: a.props.centreX - halfWidth, y: a.props.centreY - halfHeight, 
                width: this.spriteWidth, height: this.spriteHeight}
            
            if (this.detectCollision(rect1, rect2)) {
                return true;
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        });
}

detectCollision(rect1, rect2) {
	if (rect1.x < rect2.x + rect2.width &&
	rect1.x + rect1.width > rect2.x &&
	rect1.y < rect2.y + rect2.height &&
	rect1.y + rect1.height > rect2.y) {
		return true;
	}
	return false;
}

detectOutScreen(rect1) {
	if (rect1.x < 0 || rect1.x + rect1.width > this.state.windowWidth
	|| rect1.y < 0 || rect1.y + rect1.height > this.state.windowHeight) {
		return true;
	}
	return false;
}

The collision detection code itself was pilfered from here. As you can see, all we’re doing is translating our objects into rectangles, and then seeing if they intersect each other, or if the player has left the game area.

Quick note about forEach and some

I had originally used .forEach for the detectAnyCollision() code. Whilst it would, initially make sense to a C# programmer, in fact the Javascript version of this does exactly what it says on the tin; that is, it executes for each element, and there is no way to exit early!

Player Dies and Score

Now that we have introduced collision, we should consider what to do when it happens. The usual thing in a game is that the player either “dies”, or they lose “health”. Since this is inspired by a spectrum game, we’ll go with “dies”. You saw earlier that we introduced the concept of “lives” and, because it was a spectrum, it has to be 3!

The code to deal with the player death is:

PlayerDies() { 
	this.setState({
		playerLives: this.state.playerLives - 1,
		gameLoopActive: false
	});
	if (this.state.playerLives <= 0) {
		this.initiateNewGame();
	} else {
		this.resetCarPosition();
	}
	this.repositionPlayer();
	this.setState({ 
		gameLoopActive: true
	});
}

Just a quick reminder that this isn’t a comprehensive listing of code – please see the GitHub repository for that; however, apart from the reduction in lives, the most important thing here is the gameLoopActive code.

The idea here is that we only execute the game loop while this state variable is set; which means we can stop the game loop while we’re dealing with the player’s collision.

The change in the game loop code for this is very simple:

gameLoop() {
	if (!this.state.gameLoopActive) return;

 . . . 

Crashed Car

All well and good, but as it stands, this simply results in the car stopping when it hits a tree, and then being re-positioned. We can address this by adding a small “animation” to indicate a crash. If you have a look here, you’ll see why I’ve won several awards for my graphics*!

In order to plug this in, we’re going to change the car graphic binding:

render() { 
return <div onKeyDown={this.onKeyDown} tabIndex="0">
	<GameStatus Lives={this.state.playerLives} Message={this.state.message}/>
	<Background backgroundImage={backgroundImg}
	windowWidth={this.state.windowWidth} windowHeight={this.state.windowHeight} /> 
	
	<Car carImage={this.state.playerCrashed ? brokenCarImg : carImg} 
	centreX={this.state.playerX} centreY={this.state.playerY} 
	width={this.spriteWidth} height={this.spriteHeight} 
	rotation={this.state.playerRotation} /> 
	
	{this.obstacles} 
</div>
}

So, where the crashed flag is set, we’re binding to brokenCarImg; otherwise to carImg; they are defined at the top:

import carImg from '../Assets/Car.png';
import brokenCarImg from '../Assets/Crash.png';

We also split the playerDies() function into two:

playerDying(tillDeath) {
	this.setState({
		playerCrashed: true,
		gameLoopActive: false
	});
	this.stopCar();
	setTimeout(this.playerDies.bind(this), tillDeath);
}

playerDies() { 
	this.setState({
		playerLives: this.state.playerLives - 1,
		gameLoopActive: false
	});
	if (this.state.playerLives <= 0) {
		this.initiateNewGame();
	} else {
		this.resetCarPosition();
	}
	this.repositionPlayer();
	this.setState({ 
		playerCrashed: false,
		gameLoopActive: true
	});
}

All we’re doing here is calling the first function, which effectively just changes the image and then calls the second function on a timeout. Again, don’t forget the `.bind()` when you call timeout, otherwise, you won’t be able to access `this`!

Footnotes

* I haven’t actually won any awards for graphics – I had you fooled, though!

References

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Games/Techniques/2D_collision_detection

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/34653612/what-does-return-keyword-mean-inside-foreach-function/34653650

https://medium.com/@benjamincherion/how-to-break-an-array-in-javascript-6d3a55bd06f6

Console Games – Snake – Part 4 (Collision Detection)

Collision detection is pretty much necessary for any arcade game. Super Mario would be pretty boring if he just walked through the mushrooms (or whatever they were supposed to be).

mushroom

This post continues from a little series on writing console games (start here).

In our game, we have three possibilities for collision: the wall (or edge of the console), our own tail, and food. Two of these are game over, and collecting food should make the tail longer. Let’s start with game over:

The `Move()` function currently looks like this:

        private static void Move(ConsoleKeyInfo key)
        {
            Position currentPos;
            if (points.Count != 0)
                currentPos = new Position() { left = points.Last().left, top = points.Last().top };
            else
                currentPos = GetStartPosition();

            switch (key.Key)
            {
                case ConsoleKey.LeftArrow:
                    currentPos.left--;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.RightArrow:
                    currentPos.left++;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.UpArrow:
                    currentPos.top--;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.DownArrow:
                    currentPos.top++;
                    break;

            }

            points.Add(currentPos);
            CleanUp();
        }

Off the screen

Since we’re moving anyway, this may be the best time to see where we are; since the new point is created here, let’s just see if it’s off the screen. Here’s the revised bottom of the Move command:

            }

            // Check if we're off the screen
            if (currentPos.top < 0 || currentPos.top > Console.WindowHeight 
                || currentPos.left < 0 || currentPos.left > Console.WindowWidth)
            {
                GameOver();
            }

            points.Add(currentPos);
            CleanUp();

Use Shift-Alt-F10 to get VS to generate the `GameOver()` function; which will just look like this:

        private static void GameOver()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

Crash into the tail

For this, we need to make a few small changes. The first is to change the _lastKey variable to look like this:

static ConsoleKeyInfo? _lastKey;

This means that we can determine whether a key has been pressed or not; next, check the collision; here’s the latest bottom of the Move function (we’ll refactor later):

                GameOver();
            }

            // Check if we've crashed into the tail
            if (points.Any(p => p.left == currentPos.left && p.top == currentPos.top))
            {
                GameOver();
            }

            points.Add(currentPos);

Just a simple Lambda to check if the head has crashed into the tail. In `UpdateGame()` the call to Move() now needs to deal with a nullable value:

            if (_lastKey.HasValue)
            {
                Move(_lastKey.Value);
            }

Food

Finally, we need to detect if we’ve eaten the food; We’ll refactor the bottom of the move function and create a `DetectCollision()` function:

        private static void DetectCollision(Position currentPos)
        {
            // Check if we're off the screen
            if (currentPos.top < 0 || currentPos.top > Console.WindowHeight
                || currentPos.left < 0 || currentPos.left > Console.WindowWidth)
            {
                GameOver();
            }

            // Check if we've crashed into the tail
            if (points.Any(p => p.left == currentPos.left && p.top == currentPos.top))
            {
                GameOver();
            }

            // Check if we've eaten the food
            if (_foodPosition.left == currentPos.left && _foodPosition.top == currentPos.top)
            {
                _length++;
                _foodPosition = null;
            }
        }

All we’ve done here is checked the food position against the current one, increased the length of the tail, and then removed the food so that it will be recreated somewhere else on the screen; the `Move()` function now looks like this:

        private static void Move(ConsoleKeyInfo key)
        {
            Position currentPos;
            if (points.Count != 0)
                currentPos = new Position() { left = points.Last().left, top = points.Last().top };
            else
                currentPos = GetStartPosition();

            switch (key.Key)
            {
                case ConsoleKey.LeftArrow:
                    currentPos.left--;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.RightArrow:
                    currentPos.left++;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.UpArrow:
                    currentPos.top--;
                    break;
                case ConsoleKey.DownArrow:
                    currentPos.top++;
                    break;

            }

            DetectCollision(currentPos);

            points.Add(currentPos);
            CleanUp();
        }

Is that it?

To all intents and purposes, that is the game. It now does everything bar one feature, which is to keep score. For the final post, we’ll address this, along with the speed (it should speed up gradually to make the higher levels difficult). Also, there is a little tidying up to do.

Remember that the latest version of this is here.