Tag Archives: Blazor

Using Blazor Components

Imagine that you’re writing a Blazor application – maybe it’s similar to this one. Now, imagine that you have a large chunk of HTML in your main view. You might think: I wish I was using React, then I could separate this into its own component.

You can also do this in Blazor. Here’s how.

Components in Blazor

Let’s start with moving your code. The first step is to cut your HTML and paste it into a new Razor Component:

The format of your new component, from scratch, will be:

<h3>Component Name</h3>

@code {

}

Your existing code should go beneath, or instead of:

<h3>Component Name<h3>

Parameters

The @code section allows you to put all kinds of crazy C# code in a code behind type model – so you probably don’t want to use that, except for passing parameters; for example:

@code {
    [Parameter]
    private string MyParameter { get; set; }
}

This allows you to pass a string into your component; for example (in your main view):

<MyComponent MyParameter="test" />

Complex Parameters

So far so good. But what if you need a complex type? You could, for example, pass a View Model into your component:

[Parameter]
private MyViewModel MyViewModel { get; set; }

You can pass this into the component as though it were a primitive type:

<MyComponent MyViewModel="@MyViewModel" />

This means that you can lift and shift the code with no changes.

Using External Namespaces

As with standard C#, you can access anything within the current namespace. Should you need any classes that are not in your current namespace, you can declare them at the top of the file, like this:

@using MVVMShirt

<h3>My Component</h3>

Summary

Blazor is still in its infancy, but hopefully, adding actual code to these @code sections will become as frowned upon as code-behind.

Adding Logging to Client Side Blazor

Whilst there are some pre-built libraries for this, I seemed to be getting Mono linking errors. What finally worked for me was to install the pre-release versions of:

Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Logging -Version 3.0.0-preview6.19304.6
Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Console -Version 3.0.0-preview6.19304.6

Now, in your View Model, accept the Logger:

public MyViewModel(ILogger<MyViewModel> logger)

Then you can log as normal:

_logger.LogInformation("Hello, here's a log message");

You should now see the debug message in the F12 console.

You might be wondering why you don’t need to explicitly inject the logging capability; the reason is that:

BlazorWebAssemblyHost.CreateDefaultBuilder()            

Does that for you.

Using View Models in Blazor

Being new to Blazor (and Razor), the first thing that tripped me up was that the view seemed divorced from the rest of the application. In fact, this is actually quite a nice design, as it forces the use of DI.

For example, say you wanted to create a View Model for your view, you could register that ViewModel in the Startup:

        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddTransient<MyViewModel, MyViewModel>();
        }

Note here that you don’t need an interface. If you’re only creating an interface for the purpose of this then that abstraction provides no benefit. That isn’t to say there may not be a reason for having an interface, but if you have one and this is the only place it’s used, you probably should reconsider.

The views in Razor / Blazor (at the time of writing) are *.razor files. In order to resolve the dependency inside the view, you would use the following syntax:

@page "/"
@inject ViewModels.MyViewModel MyViewModel

(Note that @page “/” is only in this snippet to orientate the code.)

You can call initialisation in the view model using something like:

@code {

    protected override async Task OnInitAsync()
    {
        await MyViewModel.Init();
    }    
}

And, within your HTML, you can reference the view model like this:

<div>@MyViewModel.MyData</div>

Magic. Hopefully more to come on Blazor soon.