Tag Archives: Azure Function

Add HttpClientFactory to an Azure Function

Since I first wrote about dependency injection in Azure Functions things have moved on a bit. These days, the Azure Functions natively* support DI. In this post, I’ll cover, probably the most common, DI scenario: adding HttpClientFactory to your project.

I’ll assume that you have an Azure function, and that it looks something like this:

    public static class Function1
    {
        [FunctionName("Function1")]
        public static async Task<IActionResult> Run(
            [HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", "post", Route = null)] HttpRequest req,
            ILogger log)
        {
            log.LogInformation("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");

            string name = req.Query["name"];

            string requestBody = await new StreamReader(req.Body).ReadToEndAsync();
            dynamic data = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(requestBody);
            name = name ?? data?.name;

            return name != null
                ? (ActionResult)new OkObjectResult($"Hello, {name}")
                : new BadRequestObjectResult("Please pass a name on the query string or in the request body");
        }
    }

I’ll assume that, because that’s the default HTTP Trigger function you get when you select to create a new function.

NuGet Packages

You’ll need a few NuGet packages; first, you’ll need:

Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Http

Which will allow you to use the HttpClientFactory. You’ll also need some packages for the DI:

Install-Package Microsoft.Azure.Functions.Extensions
Install-Package Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Functions

Startup

If you create a new MVC project, you get a Startup class, which manages all your DI, etc. So we’re going to create one here. Create a Startup.cs class in the function app:

    public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
    {
        public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
        {
            builder.Services.AddHttpClient();
        }
    }

The Configure method is a member of FunctionsStartup (ctrl-. to add the override). You’ll also need to add the following line outside of the namespace:

[assembly: FunctionsStartup(typeof(FullNamespace.Startup))]

Essentially, FullNamepsace here refers to the fully qualified Startup class in your project. Without this line, nothing will be added to the IoC container.

The AddHttpClient call inside Configure adds HttpClientFactory to your IoC container.

Azure Function

If you have a look at the code above, you’ll notice the class is static. We can’t have constructor injection into a static class (because we can’t have a constructor); let’s change that to an instance class:

        public Function1(IHttpClientFactory httpClientFactory)
        {
            _httpClientFactory = httpClientFactory;
        }

You’ll also need to change the function itself from static to instance:

        public async Task<IActionResult> Run(

That’s it – you can now reference HttpClientFactory from inside your function.

Notes

* Maybe not exactly ‘natively’

References

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-functions/functions-dotnet-dependency-injection

What can you do with a logic app? Part Two – Use Excel to Manage an E-mail Notification System

In this post I started a series of posts covering different scenarios that you might use an Azure Logic App, and how you might go about that. In this, the second post, we’re going to set-up an excel spreadsheet that allows you simply add a row to an excel table and have a logic app act on that row.

So, we’ll set-up a basic spreadsheet with an e-mail address, subject, text and a date we want it to send; then we’ll have the logic app send the next eligible mail in the list, and mark it as sent.

Spreadsheet

I’ll first state that I do not have an Office 365 subscription, and nothing that I do here will require one. We’ll create the spreadsheet in Office Online. Head over to One Drive (if you don’t have a one drive account then they are free) and create a new spreadsheet:

In the spreadsheet, create a new table – just enter some headers (like below) and then highlight the columns and “Insert Table”:

Remember to check “My Table Has Headers”.

Now enter some data:

Create the Logic App

In this post I showed how you can use Visual Studio to create and deploy a logic app; we’ll do that here:

Once we’ve created the logic app, we’ll need to select to create an action that will get the Excel file that we created; in this case “List rows present in a table”:

This also requires that we specify the table (if you’re using the free online version of Excel then you’ll have to live with the table name you’re given):

Loop

This retrieves a list of rows, and so the next step is to iterate through them one-by-one. We’ll use a For-Each:

Conditions

Okay, so we’re now looking at every row in the table, but we don’t want every row in the table, we only want the ones that have not already been sent, and the ones that are due to be sent (so the date is either today, or earlier). We can use a conditional statement for this:

But we have two problems:

  • Azure Logic Apps are very bad at handling dates – that is to say, they don’t
  • There is currently no way in an Azure Logic App to update an Excel spreadsheet row (you can add and delete only)

The former is easily solved, and the way I elected to solve the latter is to simply delete the row instead of updating it. It is possible to simply delete the current row, and add it back with new values; however, we won’t bother with that here.

Back to the date problem; what we need here is an Azure function…

Creating an Azure Function

Here is the code for our function (see here for details of how to create one):

        [FunctionName("DatesCompare")]
        public static IActionResult Run([HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "get", "post", Route = null)]HttpRequest req, TraceWriter log)
        {
            log.Info("C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");

            string requestBody = new StreamReader(req.Body).ReadToEnd();
            return ParseDates(requestBody);

        }

        public static IActionResult ParseDates(string requestBody)
        {
            dynamic data = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(requestBody);

            DateTime date1 = (DateTime)data.date1;
            DateTime date2 = DateTime.FromOADate((double)data.date2);

            int returnFlagIndicator = 0;
            if (date1 > date2)
            {
                returnFlagIndicator = 1;
            }
            else if (date1 < date2)
            {
                returnFlagIndicator = -1;
            }

            return (ActionResult)new OkObjectResult(new
            {
                returnFlag = returnFlagIndicator
            });
        }

There’s a few points to note about this code:
1. The date coming from Excel extracts as a double, which is why we need to use FromOADate.
2. The reason to split the function up is so that the main logic can be more easily unit tested. If you ever need a reason for unit testing then try to work out why an Azure function isn’t working inside a logic app!

The logic around this function looks like this:

We build up the request body with the information that we have, and then parse the output. Finally, we can check if the date is in the past and then send the e-mail:

Lastly, as we said earlier, we’ll delete the row to ensure that the e-mail is only sent once:

The eagle eyed and sane amongst you will notice that I’ve used the subject as a key. Don’t do this – it’s very bad practice!

References

https://github.com/Azure/azure-functions-host/wiki/Azure-Functions-runtime-2.0-known-issues