Tag Archives: Action

Testing for Exceptions using the Arrange Act Assert Pattern in C# 7

Unit testing massively benefits from following the Arrange / Act / Assert pattern. I’ve seen tests that are not written in this way, and they can be sprawling and indecipherable, either testing many different things in series, or testing nothing at all except the .Net Framework.

I recently found an issue while trying to test for an exception being thrown, which is that Nunit (and probably other frameworks) test for an exception by accepting a delegate to test. Here’s an example:

        [Test]
        public void Test_ThrowException_ExceptionThrown()
        {
            // Arrange
            TestClass tc = new TestClass();

            // Act / Assert
            Assert.Throws(typeof(Exception), tc.ThrowException);
        }

We’re just testing a dummy class:

    public class TestClass
    {
        public void ThrowException()
        {
            throw new Exception("MyException");
        }
    }

C# 7 – Inline functions

If you look in the references at the bottom, you’ll see something more akin to this approach:

        public void Test_ThrowException_ExceptionThrown2()
        {
            // Arrange
            TestClass tc = new TestClass();

            // Act
            TestDelegate throwException = () => tc.ThrowException();            

            // Assert
            Assert.Throws(typeof(Exception), throwException);
        }

However, since C# 7, the option on a local function has arrived. The following has the same effect:

        [Test]
        public void Test_ThrowException_ExceptionThrown3()
        {
            // Arrange
            TestClass tc = new TestClass();

            // Act
            void CallThrowException()
            {
                tc.ThrowException();
            }

            // Assert
            Assert.Throws(typeof(Exception), CallThrowException);
        }

I think that I, personally, still prefer the anonymous function for this; however, the local function does present some options; for example:

        [Test]
        public void Test_ThrowException_ExceptionThrown4()
        {
            void CallThrowException()
            {
                // Arrange
                TestClass tc = new TestClass();

                // Act
                tc.ThrowException();
            }

            // Assert
            Assert.Throws(typeof(Exception), CallThrowException);
        }

Now I’m not so sure that I still prefer the anonymous function.

References

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/33897323/nunit-3-0-and-assert-throws

https://pmbanugo.wordpress.com/2014/06/16/exception-testing-pattern/

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24070115/best-approach-towards-applying-the-arrange-act-assert-pattern-when-expecting-exc

Working with the threading system in Unity

Unity seems to have a multi-threaded system, but I could find no way of accessing the dispatcher. Consequently, it’s necessary to create some kind of self-rolled task queue. The specific problem that I faced was with using the timer; here’s the code for the timer:

public class MasterScript : MonoBehaviour
{
    private Timer _timer;

    void Start ()
    {
        _timer = new Timer();
        _timer.Interval = 1000;
        _timer.Elapsed += _timer_Elapsed;
        _timer.Start();
    }

    private void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        SpawnNewObject();
    }
}

The idea being that every second, and new object would appear on the screen. However, as soon as you run this, it crashes (or as close as Unity comes to crashing):

FindGameObjectWithTag can only be called from the main thread

The solution that I came up with was as follows:

public class MasterScript : MonoBehaviour
{
    public static Queue<Action> TaskQueue;

    private void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        SpawnNewObject();
    }

    private void SpawnNewObject()
    {
        TaskQueue.Enqueue(() =>
        {
            var newObj = Instantiate<GameObject>(MyObject);

Then, simply change the Update function to run them:

    void Update ()
    {
        if (TaskQueue.Count > 0)
        {
            TaskQueue.Dequeue().Invoke();
        }
    }

I’ve used the idea of a “Master Script” to deal with the queue, and this can be queued to from somewhere else in the game, which makes it more flexible.