Category Archives: ASP.NET

Beginner’s Guide to Docker – Part 2 – Debugging a Docker Build

In this post I covered the very basics of getting started with Docker. Once you start to experiment, you’ll need to learn how to debug and investigate some of the unexpected things that happen.

Caveat

In this post, you’ll see references to WebbApplication4 and WebApplication5. This is simply because, during creating the post, I switched, didn’t realise the screenshots were a mix of both, and now don’t consider it worth my time to change. Just consider the two interchangeable.

Asp.Net 5

For this example, we’ll use the default dockerfile that comes with Asp.Net 5; however, we’ll build it up ourselves. Just build a new Asp.Net project.

When setting this up, do not enable docker support:

If we had enabled docker support, we would get a docker file – so let’s build that (this is taken directly from that file). We’ll put it in the same directory as the sln file.

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/aspnet:5.0 AS base
EXPOSE 80
EXPOSE 443

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/sdk:5.0 AS build
WORKDIR /src
COPY ["WebApplication4/WebApplication4.csproj", "WebApplication4/"]
RUN dotnet restore "WebApplication4/WebApplication4.csproj"
COPY . .
WORKDIR "/src/WebApplication4"
RUN dotnet build "WebApplication4.csproj" -c Release -o /app/build

FROM build AS publish
RUN dotnet publish "WebApplication4.csproj" -c Release -o /app/publish

FROM base AS final
WORKDIR /app
COPY --from=publish /app/publish .
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "WebApplication4.dll"]

To give a quick rundown of what’s happening in this file:
– Where you can see `AS base`, `AS build`, etc, these are known as stages (we’ll come back to that).
– The `FROM` statements are telling docker to build on an existing image.
– WORKDIR changes the running directory inside the container: if this directory doesn’t exist, then the command will create it.
– COPY does what you would think: copies whatever you tell it from the first parameter (the host machine) into the second (the docker container)
– RUN executes a command in the container.
– Finally, ENTRYPOINT tells docker what to do when it starts the container – it our case, we’re running `dotnet WebApplication4.dll`.

Building and Running

To build the image, go to the application’s solution directory (where your sln file is located):

docker build -t pcm-web-app-4 . 

Once the image builds successfully, you can run it like this:

docker run pcm-web-app-4 -p 1234:80

In this post, we’re going to be more interested in debugging the build itself that running the container. Having said that, we should quickly visit the port mapping (-p); the command above is mapping the port 80 inside the container (in the docker file, we issues an EXPOSE on that port) to post 1234 on the host (so you would navigate to localhost:1234 on the host machine to connect).

Listing Docker Containers, Stopping, Killing, and Attaching

You can list running docker containers by issuing the command:

docker ps

Once you have the container ID (highlighted in the image), you can do various things with it.

Attach

To attach to the instance:

docker attach 229

Notice that I only used the first three letters of the container instance ID? That’s because docker will let you abridge the ID to the smallest unique set of numbers. This will attach to the container, and you can browse around.

Stop and Kill

If you want to remove an instance, the command is:

docker stop 229

Which will stop the current instance. However, the instance is still there. You can see it by calling:

docker ps -a

To remove the instance completely, you’ll need to call:

docker rm 229

However, you will only be able to remove the container once it’s stopped.

Now that we’ve covered some basics, let’s get into the debugging.

Target

The first useful tip here is to use the target parameter. To build the dockerfile above, you may do something like this (as shown above):

docker build -t web-app-5 . 

That will build the entire image; but if you get an issue, it may fail at an intermediate stage; in that case, you can break down the build; for example:

docker build --target build -t pcm-web-app-5 .

You can then have a look around at the build files by attaching to the container:

docker run -it pcm-web-app-5

A similar technique can be used if you’re getting issues with the entry point not functioning as expected.

ENTRYPOINT

In the dockerfile, you can simply comment out the ENTRYPOINT:

#ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "WebApplication5.dll"]

Now, if you run the container; for example:

docker run -d -it pcm-web-app-5

-d launches the container in detached mode; you can then attach:

docker attach eb5

You can then manually run the entry point; for example:

Finally, let’s see how we can see details of a running container.

Inspecting the Container

While the container is running, there’s a set of metadata that is accessible. This contains things like the IP, ports, Mac Address, Name, etc… To view this, call:

docker inspect <container ID>

For example:

docker inspect 41b

There’s a lot of information here, and you can traverse it by using the -f parameter to specify a specific attribute. For example:

docker inspect -f '{{ .State.Status }}' 07a

This will show specific properties without the need to scroll through the full JSON.

Partial HTML

In Asp.Net Core server-side rendered HTML, you have the ability to use something called Partial Views. Essentially, these give you the ability to separate your View into, what some JS frameworks may call, components.

The way it works is incredibly simple. In your main page, you define some HTML, and reference the partial view – like so:

<div class="text-center">
    <div>
        <p>Merry Christmas - here's my partial view:</p>
    </div>
    <div>
        @await Html.PartialAsync("_MyPartial", Model.MyData)
    </div>
</div>

In your partial view, which is simply another cshtml file, you define the HTML fragment, along with the model; for example:

@model IEnumerable<MyDataType>

@foreach (var item in Model)
{
    <p>item.Data</p>
    <br />
}

References

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/mvc/views/partial?view=aspnetcore-5.0

Mocking IPrinciple.Identity and Claims in NSubstitute

In ASP.Net, there is a concept of an identity. Built on top of this is an authentication system based on claims; allowing applications to implement a claims based authentication system. That is, I can determine if my user has “Administrator” privileges in the following syntax:

var claim = ClaimsIdentity.FindFirstValue("Administrator");

For more information about how claims work, see this excellent explanation. This post is not really concerned with how claims work, but rather, how to mock them out; which is much more difficult than you might guess.

In the references below, you’ll see a number of different strategies to mock out the claims and principle objects. There also seems to be a loose consensus that even attempting to do this is folly. However, I’ve cobbled together a set of mocks using NSubstitute that work. I’m not claiming that they work in all cases, or that they will work in any situation other than the specific one that I am trying to solve; but it did work for that, and so I thought it useful enough to share.

var myController = new MyController();
 
var mockClaim = new Claim("Administrator", "test");
 
var identity = Substitute.For<ClaimsIdentity>();
identity.Name.Returns("test");
identity.IsAuthenticated.Returns(true);
identity.FindFirst(Arg.Any<string>()).Returns(mockClaim);
 
var claimsPrincipal = Substitute.For<ClaimsPrincipal>();
claimsPrincipal.HasClaim(Arg.Any<string>(), Arg.Any<string>()).Returns(true);
claimsPrincipal.HasClaim(Arg.Any<Predicate<Claim>>()).Returns(true);
claimsPrincipal.Identity.Returns(identity);
 
var httpContext = Substitute.For<HttpContextBase>();            
httpContext.User.Returns(claimsPrincipal);
 
var controllerContext = new ControllerContext(
    httpContext, new System.Web.Routing.RouteData(), myController);           
 
myController.ControllerContext = controllerContext;
 
// Act
var result = myController.TestMethod();
 
// Assert
// . . .

Remember that this is only necessary if you are trying to access claims based on the identity within the `TestMethod()`. Also, I’ll remind the reader that I assert only that this worked in the specific situation that I needed it to, but it’s probably a good starting point for others.

References

https://volaresystems.com/blog/post/2010/08/19/Dont-mock-HttpContext

http://nsubstitute.github.io/help/set-return-value/

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1389744/testing-controller-action-that-uses-user-identity-name

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/13579519/mock-authenticated-user-using-moq-in-unit-testing

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/14190066/is-there-any-way-i-can-mock-a-claims-principal-in-my-asp-net-mvc-web-application

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/22762338/how-do-i-mock-user-identity-getuserid/23960592

https://dotnetcodr.com/2013/02/11/introduction-to-claims-based-security-in-net4-5-with-c-part-1/

Getting Started With SignalR

SignalR is an open source framework allowing bi-directional communication between client and server. Basically, it uses a stack of technologies; the idea being that the Signalr framework will establish the “best” way to maintain a bi-directional data stream, starting with web sockets, and falling all the way back to simply polling the server.

The following gives the basics of establishing a web site that can accept Signalr, and a console app that can send messages to it.

Create project

Let’s go MVC:

Hubs

Hubs are the way in which the Signalr service communicates with its clients. Obviously, the term service here may not actually represent a service.

To add a hub class, select the project, right-click and “New Item..”:

This adds the file, along with new references:

The code above that gets added is:

public void Hello()
{
    Clients.All.hello();
}

Clients.All returns a dynamic type, so we lose intellisense at this point. It’s important that the signature of this method is exactly correct, and that it is decorated with the name of the hub, and that it is decorated with the name of the hub; so let’s replace with:

[HubName("MyHub1")]
public class MyHub1 : Hub
{
    public void Hello(string message)
    {
        Clients.All.Hello(message);
    }
}

Change Startup.cs:

public partial class Startup
{
    public void Configuration(IAppBuilder app)
    {
        ConfigureAuth(app);
 
        app.MapSignalR();
    }
}

For all this to actually do anything, the next thing to do is hook up the JavaScript:

$(function () {
    // Declare a proxy to reference the hub. 
    var hub = $.connection.MyHub1;
    // Create a function that the hub can call to broadcast messages.
    hub.client.hello = function (message) {
 
        alert("Hello");
    };
 
    
    $.connection.hub.start()
        .done(function () { console.log("MyHub1 Successfully Started"); })
        .fail(function () { console.log("Error: MyHub1 Not Successfully Started"); })
});

Effectively, once we receive a message, we’re just going to display an alert. Once the event handler is wired up, we try to start the hub.

Next, reference the required files in BundleConfig.cs:

bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/signalr").Include(
    "~/Scripts/jquery-3.1.1.min.js").Include(
    "~/Scripts/jquery.signalR-2.2.1.js"));

These are referenced in _Layout.cshtml; remember also that, because SignalR references Jquery, you’ll need to remove other references to Jquery:

<title>@ViewBag.Title - My ASP.NET Application</title>
@Styles.Render("~/Content/css")
@Scripts.Render("~/bundles/modernizr")    
@Scripts.Render("~/bundles/signalr")    
<script type="text/javascript" src="~/signalr/hubs"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="~/Scripts/Notification.js"></script>

. . .

    </div>
    
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/bootstrap")
    @RenderSection("scripts", required: false)
</body>

Notes on Bundles

The purpose of bundling is to shrink the size of the bundled files. The idea being that small files make for a speedy web-site.

Console App

The next step is to create an application that can fire a notification to the page. In this case, I’m using a console app, just because I like to see everything working with console apps.

Start with a NuGet Reference:

The code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Message: ");
        string message = Console.ReadLine();
 
        HubConnection connection = new HubConnection("http://localhost:4053/");
        IHubProxy hub = connection.CreateHubProxy("myHub1");
                    
        connection.Start().Wait();
        hub.Invoke<string>("Hello", message).Wait();            
 
        Console.WriteLine("Sent");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

And that’s it – you should be able to send a message to the web site from the console app. The examples that are typically given elsewhere on the net are chat rooms, but this clearly has many more uses.

Some abstract notes that I made while researching this.

Adding:

Version 1

protected void Application_Start()
{
    AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();
 
    >RouteTable.Routes.MapHubs(new HubConfiguration());
 
    FilterConfig.RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
…

Gives:

Severity Code Description Project File Line Source Suppression State
Error CS0619 ‘SignalRRouteExtensions.MapHubs(RouteCollection, HubConfiguration)’ is obsolete: ‘Use IAppBuilder.MapSignalR in an Owin Startup class. See http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=320578 for more details.’ SignalRTest3 C:\Users\Paul\documents\visual studio 14\Projects\SignalRTest3\SignalRTest3\Global.asax.cs 18 Build Active

This was for v1 Signal R – superseded in 2.

CORS

During trying to get this working, the prospect of using CORS came up. This enables cross domain requests, which are typically prohibited.

Proxies

The generated Proxy can be viewed (navigate to http://localhost:4053/signalr/hubs):

 $.hubConnection.prototype.createHubProxies = function () {
        var proxies = {};
        this.starting(function () {
            // Register the hub proxies as subscribed
            // (instance, shouldSubscribe)
            registerHubProxies(proxies, true);
this._registerSubscribedHubs();
        }).disconnected(function () {
            // Unsubscribe all hub proxies when we "disconnect".  This is to ensure that we do not re-add functional call backs.
            // (instance, shouldSubscribe)
            registerHubProxies(proxies, false);
        });
proxies['MyHub1'] = this.createHubProxy('MyHub1'); 
        proxies['MyHub1'].client = { };
        proxies['MyHub1'].server = {
            hello: function (message) {
                return proxies['MyHub1'].invoke.apply(proxies['MyHub1'], $.merge(["Hello"], $.makeArray(arguments)));
             }
        };
return proxies;
    };

References:

https://www.asp.net/signalr/overview/guide-to-the-api/hubs-api-guide-javascript-client

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/signalr/overview/getting-started/tutorial-getting-started-with-signalr

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/signalr/overview/guide-to-the-api/hubs-api-guide-javascript-client

https://github.com/SignalR/SignalR/wiki/Faq

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/42108193/signalr-test-project-not-working-as-expected

http://www.jeffreyfritz.com/2015/05/where-did-my-asp-net-bundles-go-in-asp-net-5/