Reading Azure Service Bus Queue Names from the Config File

In this post, I wrote about how you might read a message from the service bus queue. However, with Azure Functions (and WebJobs), comes the ability to have Microsoft do some of this plumbing code for you.

I have a queue here (taken from the service bus explorer):

I can read this in an Azure function; let’s create a new Azure Functions App:

This time, we’ll create a Service Bus Queue Triggered function:

Out of the box, that will give you this:

public static class Function1
{
    [FunctionName("Function1")]
    public static void Run([ServiceBusTrigger("testqueue", AccessRights.Listen, Connection = "")]string myQueueItem, TraceWriter log)
    {
        log.Info($"C# ServiceBus queue trigger function processed message: {myQueueItem}");
    }
}

There’s a few things that we’ll probably want to change here. The first is “Connection”. We can remove that parameter altogether, and then add a row to the local.settings.json file (which can be overridden later inside Azure). Out of the box, you get AzureWebJobsStorage and AzureWebJobsDashboard, which both accept a connection string to a Azure Storage Account. You can also add AzureWebJobsServiceBus, which accepts a connection string to the service bus:

"Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": "DefaultEndpointsProtocol=https;AccountName=teststorage1…",
    "AzureWebJobsDashboard": "DefaultEndpointsProtocol=https;AccountName=teststorage1…",
    "AzureWebJobsServiceBus": "Endpoint=sb://pcm-servicebustest.servicebus.windows.net/;SharedAccessKeyName=RootManageSharedAccessKey;SharedAccessKey=…"
  }

If you run the job, it will now pick up any outstanding entries in that queue. But, what if you don’t know the queue name; for example, what if you find out the queue name is different. To illustrate the point; here, I’m looking for “testqueue1”, but the queue name (as you saw earlier) is “testqueue”:

public static class Function1
{
    [FunctionName("Function1")]
    public static void Run([ServiceBusTrigger("testqueue1", AccessRights.Listen)]string myQueueItem, TraceWriter log)
    {
        log.Info($"C# ServiceBus queue trigger function processed message: {myQueueItem}");
    }
}

Obviously, if you’re looking for a queue that doesn’t exist, bad things happen:

To fix this, I have to change the code… which is broadly speaking a bad thing. What we can do, is configure the queue name in the config file; like this:

"Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": " . . . ",
    . . .,
    "queue-name":  "testqueue"
  }

And we can have the function look in the config file by changing the queue name:

[FunctionName("Function1")]
public static void Run([ServiceBusTrigger("%queue-name%", AccessRights.Listen)]string myQueueItem, TraceWriter log)
{
    log.Info($"C# ServiceBus queue trigger function processed message: {myQueueItem}");
}

The pattern of supplying a variable name in the format “%variable-name%” seems to work across other triggers and bindings for Azure Functions.

Deployment

That’s now looking much better, but what happens when the function gets deployed? Let’s see:

We can now see that the function is deployed:

At the minute, it won’t do anything, because it’s looking for a queue name in a setting that only exists locally. Let’s fix that:

Remember to save the changes.

Looking at the logs confirms that this now runs correctly.

3 thoughts on “Reading Azure Service Bus Queue Names from the Config File

  1. Neil

    I have a specific SharedAccessKeyName that is only valid for listening to a particular topic/subscription. How do I specify that in the ServiceBusTrigger?

    Reply
    1. pcmichaels Post author

      When you create your Shared Access Key Signature, you should be given a connection string, so you can specify this in AzureWebJobs… (depending on what kind of SB you’re using). Does that answer your question?

      Reply
  2. Tyrone

    Great Nugget. Surprisingly this was hard to find, didn’t see it on the MSFT site. Needed to make queue names configurable and here it was.

    Reply

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